Politics

Al Jazeera America

SÃO PAULO — On Aug. 16, hundreds of thousands of protesters across Brazil took to the streets demanding President Dilma Rousseff’s ouster over an economy in recession and a corruption scandal at the state-run oil firm Petrobras.

Police estimated at least 879,000 people joined the nationwide demonstrations. Rousseff, who was re-elected to a second term by a whisker 10 months ago, has seen her approval rating dip over the past few months. There is now little confidence in her ability to govern effectively and get Brazil’s economy back into the black.

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VICE News

SÃO PAULO — Brazil announced to much fanfare this week plans to zero illegal deforestation on its territory by 2030 and restore an area of rainforest the size of Pennsylvania. But experts say the plans are unambitious and activists called the promises “a crushing disappointment” that mounted to nothing more than targets already stipulated by Brazilian law.

Climate change was among the headlining issues in a joint declaration made Tuesday by Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and US President Barack Obama at the White House.

“We have committed to reach … a zero illegal deforestation rate between now and 2030,” Rousseff said, describing climate change as “one of the world’s central challenges for the 21st Century.”

Rousseff also vowed Brazil would restore 120,000 square kilometers (46,330 square miles) of forest over the same period.

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English version of BBC Russian article

SÃO PAULO — Events commemorating the 70th anniversary of VE Day have naturally focused on the Second World War’s key players – Germany, Italy, Britain, the United States, France and the countries of the Former Soviet Union. 

But Brazil – the only South American country to participate militarily in World War II – is not one for military pomp.

President Dilma Rousseff visited Rio de Janeiro on 8 May for a ceremony for the approximately 450 Brazilians soldiers killed in the war, but didn’t travel to Moscow for Victory Day celebrations as had been rumoured.

Brazil, as a whole, was always unlikely to pay much attention to the date.

Few Brazilians know about the 25,000 men who set out from Rio in 1944 to fight alongside the Allied Forces in Italian battlegrounds to break through the Gothic Line. Although the World Wars are taught in schools, Brazil’s role is either a minor detail or overlooked entirely.

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Anadolu Agency

SÃO PAULO — Brazil’s Supreme Court on Friday released the names of senior politicians it has authorised prosecutors to investigate for their alleged roles in a multi-billion-dollar corruption scandal at state-run oil giant Petrobras.

Supreme Court minister Teori Zavascki granted investigations into 47 politicians, including 12 acting senators and 22 acting deputies, under Operation Lava Jato, or Car Wash, that is probing the vast alleged kickback scheme.

Some of Brazil’s top politicians — including acting and former congressional leaders, senators, deputies, ministers, governors, and even a former president — could now face prison sentences, if tried and convicted.

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Anadolu Agency

SÃO PAULO — The second major protest against a recent price hike in public transit fares this year ended in violence on Friday evening, with a number of protesters arrested in central São Paulo.

The demonstration and march, called by the MPL, the Free Fare Movement, gathered 3,000 protesters, according to police estimates; organisers said 20,000 attended. An Anadolu correspondent at the scene put the total at about 5,000.

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Anadolu Agency

SÃO PAULO – Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff vowed to fight corruption, restore economic growth, and put education at the heart of sweeping reforms during an inauguration ceremony on Thursday.

In her 40-minute address, the president acknowledged widespread public dissatisfaction with her government, saying that Brazilians had “sent (her) a message demanding change”, and vowed political reforms and nationwide action on corruption.

Rousseff said her second term in office would follow a simple motto — “Brazil: The Nation of Education” — that would put improving schools and universities, as well as improved access to them, at the heart of her new government.

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Anadolu Agency

SÃO PAULO — Disappointing levels of investment, confidence and competitiveness means Brazil’s economy will barely grow this year, according to a key report by the International Monetary Fund published on Tuesday.

The October edition of the global lender’s flagship World Economic Outlook report slashed its July estimate of 1.3 percent to 0.3 percent, which, if confirmed, would be the second worst performance by the Latin American economic powerhouse since 1998.

Currently the world’s seventh economy, Brazil should grow more in 2015, the report says, but still less than previously predicted, revising down a previous estimate of 2.0 percent to 1.4 percent.

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