PSDB

Ever since São Paulo deputy and Christian Social Party (PSC) member Marco Feliciano was elected as president of Brazil’s Human Rights and Minorities Commission (CDHM), he has gained notoriety throughout the country over accusations that he made racist, homophobic and misogynist statements, which sparked protests in over forty cities in Brazil, and other countries including the US and France, demanding that he be removed from the role.

Protest against Marco Feliciano. Photo by José Cruz/ABr.

Protest against Marco Feliciano have spread to 43 cities in Brazil and as far abroad as Berlin and Paris. Photo by José Cruz/ABr.

Feliciano was voted in by the Commission with eleven votes of a possible 18 (only twelve took part in the end) on 7 March and, following further debates, it was decided on 26 March that he would keep his position.

However, it was reported that attempts to convince Feliciano to step down would continue, including by Henrique Eduardo Alves, President of the Chamber of Deputies, who has weighed into the debate, saying that the CDHM, given its importance, cannot remain at this “untenable” impasse.

Despite its size, the PSC has two members on the Commission, whereas the far bigger Brazilian Democratic Movement Party (PMDB) and Brazilian Social Democracy Party (PSDB) are not represented.

While he has enjoyed general support from his party and Conservative Christian groups, others question whether Feliciano’s views on minorities make him the best choice for Brazil’s top human rights official. In part because in 2011, Feliciano took to Twitter to say that people of African descent were cursed and has also made many comments seen as extremely offensive by sexual minorities and atheists.

The latest protests calling for his resignation have seen vigils and the burning of effigies in front of government buildings in Brasília. There have also been protests in support of his role and Feliciano has spoken of his determination to stay, saying he has the assurances of the Commission.

Commentators believe his position is untenable and if he does not resign, he will have to be removed from office as the Commission has not functioned in any meaningful way since the controversial election.

Read the full article on The Rio Times website.

Voters in fifty cities, including 17 state capitals, headed back to the polls on Sunday in the second round of Brazil’s municipal elections, to decide on their prefeito (city mayor). The municipal elections have also served as a mid-term litmus test on the popularity of the parties looking toward the 2014 presidential race.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and new São Paulo mayor Fernando Haddad, photo by Antônio Cruz/ABr.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and new São Paulo mayor Fernando Haddad meet at the Planalto, Brasília, a day after his victory in the second round of municipal elections. Photo by Antônio Cruz/ABr.

The second round involved cities with populations over 200,000 where no candidate had reached the fifty-percent threshold in the first round held on October 7th.

The win by Fernando Haddad (PT) as mayor of São Paulo against rival José Serra (PSDB) was perhaps the best news for the party.

However, the PT did not fare as well nationwide, losing control of much of the northeast, including Salvador, Recife and Fortaleza.

The PT is now leading in bigger cities while the PMDB is in smaller ones, and half of the elected candidates are from the three leading parties – the PT, PMDB and PSDB.

Also in the full article on The Rio Times (click here):

  • Did the Mensalão scandal affects the number of votes the PT received?
  • Who will be in the running for the 2014 presidential elections after Serra’s disappointing result in São Paulo?
  • What will now happen to the political landscape in Brazil?